Nicolo Amati

B.1596, d.1684, Cremona. Son, pupil and successor of Hieronymus Amati. Nicolo was active from around 1610 and his hand is detectable in work bearing the Brothers’ label from 1620. A precociously gifted craftsman even by the standards of his own family, it is very fortunate that he survived the plague which decimated Cremona in the early 1630s. It took some time for the workshop to recover, but by the 1640s was in full production. To achieve this Nicolo took in apprentices, the first and most important of whom was Andrea Guarneri. This secured the status of Cremona as the home of violin making by initiating another dynasty into the techniques and methods of the Amati, increasing the flow of Cremonese work into the rest of Europe. Many other documented apprentices came and went, including Christofori, Gennaro, Pasta and Rogeri, and several German craftsmen. By ca 1660 he was also assisted by his son Hieronymus (II). Earlier writers liberally associated other eminent makers with the Amati workshop, notably Stradivari, Rugeri, Stainer and Cappa, but there is no evidence for this in any documentation so far discovered. Nicolo developed the Amati model with higher, more dramatically sculpted archings, and finally changed the flutings of the scroll by extending the central ridge to the throat, keeping the two flutes separate for the full depth of the face of the volute. His most significant innovation was the ‘Grand Amati’ model, which took the larger sized pattern used by his father and grandfather, but increased the width overall. This model became the standard for subsequent Cremonese makers, and was adopted almost universally elsewhere. Many consider his masterpiece to be the ‘Alard’ violin, in the collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Violas and cellos of large size, but comparatively rare. (c. - 1684)
AMATI, Nicolò Born 1596, died 1684 Cremona Italy. Son, pupil, and successor of Hieronymus Amati, above. Apparently assisting his father from c.1610, his hand is detectable in work bearing the ‘Brothers Amati’ label from 1620 . A precociously gifted craftsman even by the standards of his own family, it is very fortunate that he survived the plague which decimated Cremona in the early 1630s. It took some time for the workshop to recover, but by the 1640s it was in full production. To achieve this Nicolò took in apprentices, the first and most important of whom was Andrea Guarneri. This secured the status of Cremona as the home of violin making by initiating Andrea Guarneri (and in due cour

£ 383,591
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